National Association of Productivity         & Organizing Professionals


 
 

7 Deadly Sins of a Walk in Closet Design

28 Oct 2016 9:09 AM | Deleted user

So you’re sick and tired of the mess that is your walk in closet. Whether you’re looking for clothes for work – or worse yet – that formal event where you’re trying valiantly to find those seldom used jewelry and accessories, getting ready to go in a disorganized closet can be a pain.

The challenge is who do you call to rid yourself of this closet disaster. Who will not only “feel your pain” but is qualified to evaluate your storage needs and make recommendations to make your space work (and not make any “deadly” design mistakes you can’t fix later)? Since you can’t call “Ghost Busters” here’s 4 types of people who might be able to help: 

  • The local “handyman” – You could stop at your neighbor’s house who is using a local handyman (who hopefully hasn’t turned into “Eldon the Painter” from Murphy Brown fame). Maybe he can do the job….. but what does he really know about closets?
  • Put the project on your spouses “honey do list” – OK – the list is a mile long already…but maybe they’ll get to this one pretty soon….but what kind of product will they buy? Will the local home center have options which work effectively and efficiently in your space? Will there be a human being at the store that has any concept about closets to help pick out the right things?
  • A finished carpenter- There are finished carpenters who do beautiful woodwork. The challenge might be can you afford them? Are they really experts on how to design and plan a closet? Would a wood closet system be the best way to go?
  • A closet designer - They have the specific expertise in closet design – but will they have a system(s) to fit your budget?

While you can call any of the 4 types above will they know how to design the space to not make mistakes (or deadly sins) which you can’t work around (or if you have to they will cost you money you shouldn’t have to spend if the design was correct in the first place)? The most likely type to get it right would be the closet designer since they focus on this product specifically.

Knowing the 7 deadly sins can help you save money, improve functionality and increase enjoyment of using your closet. Let’s take a look at these 7 deadly sins.

Deadly Sin #1 – I can’t open these closet drawers fully

Adding pull out drawers and baskets to a custom closet design will dress up the space (and provide cool ways to compartmentalize your jewelry, socks, watches and clothing). Custom closets are the luxury features owners in Dublin, Worthington, Upper Arlington or any nice neighborhood in Columbus would love to have. With that being said if you put drawers in the wrong place it can be disastrous. According to custom closet designer Denise Butchko (a design expert with Butchko and Company in Chicago IL) it’s best to place your drawer’s front and center in the design. Center them on the door opening and design other hanging spaces or shelves around them. Whatever you do, don’t put them behind the closet door so the drawers and door bang into one another.

Deadly Sin #2 – Not “accounting” for shoe location

In many existing closets there is a rod along the top with a shelf above and shoes laying on the floor in a disorganized mess. Why do your shoes need to be buried on the “down low” – other than you don’t have a good system today to get them off the ground? Moving shoes up is ergonomically better and then you can visually see them. So don’t commit the deadly sins of burying your shoes. Consider using closet accessories like a shoe shelf or shoe cubby to keep everything available and visible.

Here’s a bonus design tip accounting people might like. In accounting you talk about FIFO (first goods in, first good out). With shoe location use the same “accounting principle.” Place the shoe storage as the first area inside your closet - since you put on and take off your shoes as you enter your walk in closet (first shoes in, first shoes off).

Deadly sin #3 – Failure to “space out” your dimensions – You’re not designing a hotel closet which is there for the use of many random people and is seldom used. Your closet is all about you (and your significant other) and the multitude of stuff you have. Think through how many shirts and blouses you want to hang. How many sweaters do you need to fit on these shelves? Allow about 1” for the shirts/blouses and 10 – 14” wide for the folded sweaters (depending on size). Taking the time to inventory what you need to store can guide the decision making process of how wide dimensionally you need to space apart the vertical sections of your closet to effectively utilize space. 

Deadly Sin #4 – The “standard” closet system is in the middle of the air vent or access panel

So your husband went out and bought one of those low-priced standardized closets from your local big box store (so far, so good). He started installing and figured out the supports go right through the middle of your access panel for your plumbing in the adjoining room. What do you do now? Effective closet design starts with a thoughtful game plan (and possibly different sized sections between shelves and the vertical panel supports). Don’t commit this closet design sin. Know where the obstructions are before you buy a system, or get a closet designer who will design around these hidden landmines.  

Deadly Sin #5 – Cutting corners in closet structure and design

In design and in structure cutting corners (while cheaper for the contractor or homeowner in the short run) can cost you the ability to have useable space or result in a system which wants to pull away from the wall. From a structure standpoint make sure if you use a wall hung system it is properly tied into the studs with the right anchors. For floor mounted cabinetry use cleats to tie in the vertical shelf support to the walls. From a design perspective if you have a “U shaped” design with shelving around the corners make sure they are 24” to 30” deep – otherwise it will be difficult to use this space for hanging or folded clothes in the corner.

Deadly Sin #6 – Don’t plan as if you’re Gumby and can reach anywhere 

If you’re old enough do you remember the green rubbery toy (which had its own show in the late 1950’s and 1960’s) which could stretch and reach anywhere? Well – while I wish I had the flexibility of Gumby (maybe I could get closer to this if I just attended those Yoga classes my wife has been trying to get me to go to), I don’t have a stretchable arm that can reach anywhere (and my guess you don’t either). Given this fact we need to design closets to be thoughtful about reaching the top shelf or top rod and storing the right items up there. For the top shelf it’s usually best to keep lighter things you don’t need to access often. If you’re vertically challenged (or need the assistance of a wheelchair) consider adding a pull down rod to bring clothes on upper rods down to meet you.

Deadly Sin #7 – Trying to fit 5 lbs. of S*** into a 10 lb. bag. The overdone closet design

When I was growing up my Dad used to say don’t try to fit 10 lbs. of S*** (fill in the expletive here) into a 5 lb. bag. Basically it’s possible to become so enamored with all the fun “bells and whistles” of a new closet design (adding doors, drawers, valet rods, jewelry boxes…the list can go on and on) you overdesign the space. A clean, organized and effective life is often simplicity in design (think about the IPhone and how easy it is to learn this unit “on the fly” is an example of design simplicity).

To ensure a cleaner, minimalist design first take an inventory of all the items you have in your closet and determine what you’re not really using and can give away. If you’re in Columbus Dress for Success is a great organization that helps women who need clothing for work you could donate your seldom used things to. Pair down first, then think what storage components you need to keep things nice and tidy for your new custom closet design (note a Professional Organizer can also help you with this). After you’ve streamlined the closet (and thought of items you might like to add to the closet like jewelry or home office storage that’s in other rooms) then you’re ready to do your design (and not overdesign) your space.

Conclusion

While these 7 deadly sins of closet design might be scary, it’s nice knowing you haven’t started your project yet.

If you have questions, comments or need help with a Columbus custom closet call the numbers below or add your thoughts to this post.

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For help with a Columbus home organization project call Innovate Home Org in Columbus at 614-545-6888 or in Cleveland call 216-658-1290.

Follow the author @Mike_Foti or our companies’ @InnovateBuild and @InnovateHomeOrg on Twitter.


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